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The Killer Veteran – The Spiritual Implications for Veterans who Kill in War

Maj, 2021
Artikel:

This paper discusses Spiritual Injuries (SI) in veterans and explores how SI can be a significant cause of distress and discomfort, potentially becoming a major contributor to mental health issues in veterans. In order to help practitioners work with veterans, this paper identifies the SI for veterans who kill in war.

Abstrakt

For many veterans who have been forced to make the decision to kill in war, the memory of what has happened may last far longer than the milliseconds it took to fire their rifle or launch their missile. As veterans they carry the shame and guilt of what they have done for the rest of their lives. This is a critical issue for veterans and their supporters, as Spiritual Injuries (SI) can be a significant cause of distress and discomfort and may become a major contributor to mental health issues and have negative effects on their overall well-being. In order to help practitioners work with veterans, this paper identifies the spiritual implications for veterans who kill in war. Sadly, it will be necessary to develop some understanding of the nature of killing in war and the particular circumstances of those that kill. Initially, there is be a brief literature review of some of the key material published on this topic. The overall aim is to identify the key features of killing in war. In particular, that killing is not an isolated act involving one person, but rather part of a Kill Chain. How and where personnel are placed along the chain substantially shapes the depth and nature of their spiritual need. Discussions regarding spiritual need are set within the framework of earlier work on SI and is squarely aimed at creating a list of spiritual implications as well as a redemptive process that both veterans and their supporters can use to help find peace.

Fullständig referens

Davies, M. (2021). The Killer Veteran – The Spiritual Implications for Veterans who Kill in War. Journal of Veterans Studies, 7(1), 190–203. DOI: http://doi.org/10.21061/jvs.v7i1.232

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